Image of the Month: Trachea and Vasculature of the Mouse Lung

This colorized image shows mouse lung fluorescent teal muscle actin defining smooth muscle cells in the trachea and arteries. Courtesy of Optical Imaging and Vital Microscopy Core/research from the Wythe lab.

In his lab at Baylor College of Medicine, Dr. Joshua D. Wythe and his colleagues conduct cardiovascular research covering the following areas:

  • Vascular Development, trying to understand how the identities of arterial and venous endothelial cells are maintained in the developing vertebrate embryo.
  • Cardiac Development, this area of research focuses on understanding how cell fates are specified in the embryonic mouse heart, both in normal and developmentally compromised genetic backgrounds.
  • Cardiovascular Disease, in particular congenital cardiac malformations such as those related to the septum, the wall that divides the right and left sides of the heart.
Dr. Joshua D. Wythe

 

 

Dr. Joshua D. Wythe is an assistant professor of molecular physiology and biophysics and a member of the Cardiovascular Research Institute at Baylor College of Medicine.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Mary Dickinson

 

“ The Optical Imaging and Vital Microscopy Core at Baylor College of Medicine is dedicated to 3-D imaging of complex systems and high-resolution investigations of living cells. We offer live intravital imaging that allows us to observe cells in their native environment or within a 3D construct that mimics the microenvironment in order to determine how they react to various stimuli over time,” said director Dr. Mary Dickinson, professor and Kyle and Josephine Morrow Endowed Chair of molecular physiology and biophysics and associate dean of research at Baylor College of Medicine.

 

 

 

By Ana María Rodríguez, Ph.D.

 

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One thought on “Image of the Month: Trachea and Vasculature of the Mouse Lung

  • March 19, 2019 at 9:22 am
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    As a microscopist, I would love to know more of the technical details regrding how this beautiful image was captured.

    Reply

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